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Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. As the festival starts this Friday, this is the last trailer we’ll be posting – it’s time for the films in real life! Also check out the film schedule on our website. Today we’re featuring The Cove.

The 2010 Oscar for Best Documentary went to this film, a story that brought audiences to tears at last year’s Mountainfilm, where it showed once in a surprise screening. The Cove investigates dolphin harvesting in Japan and follows animal-rights activist Ric O’Barry—the star of the 1964 television show Flipper—as he tries to stop the slaughter of dolphins on the southwest coast of Japan. His swashbuckling crew includes free divers, scientists, filmmakers and techy geeks who use reconnaissance, hidden cameras and other covert techniques to expose this atrocity and examine mercury poisoning, the hazard of consuming animals this high on the food chain. Directed by National Geographic photographer Louie Psihoyos, The Cove has impacted the practice of dolphin harvesting and become a model for activist documentaries.

Show Time:
Friday, 9:45 p.m., Palm Theatre

In Person:
Cameraman Eric Abramson, Production Manager Joe Chisholm & Louie Psihoyos

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Also check out the film schedule on our website. Today we’re featuring Found.

Found is an artistic representation of the poetry of Souvankham Thammavongsa, a Laotian woman born in a refugee camp in northeastern Thailand who immigrated to Toronto. Her dramatic birth and uncertain early life—without a land to call home and without a passport—led to a revelation that is deeply felt by many artists when they discover their medium: “When I learned to read…I knew this, this would be my way in.”

Show Times:

Saturday, 6:15 p.m., Sheridan Opera House
Sunday, 6:45 p.m., Nugget

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Also check out the film schedule on our website. Today we’re featuring Africa’s Lost Eden.

At the age of 38, Greg Carr had made enough money to last a lifetime and became a philanthropist. As Bob Shacochis wrote in Outside magazine, “…by 2002, Carr was inundated with projects: turning the former headquarters of the Aryan Nations into a peace park; donating $18 million to establish Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights; starting a radio station in Afghanistan. He was conducting a marching band of altruism, on fire with intellectual stimulation yet yearning for something with ‘a little vision to it, some mystery, some romance, some difficult problems to solve.’” He found one helluva problem in Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, once a paradise for wildlife but now another victim of the country’s two decades of civil war. As this film from National Geographic shows, Carr committed $40 million of his fortune and 20 years of his life to return Gorongosa to its former glory.

Show Time: Saturday, 9:30 am at the Masons Theatre

In Person: Greg Carr & Bob Shacochis

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films each Tuesday and Friday, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Today we’re featuring Mount St. Elias.

The distance from Mount Saint Elias’ summit (18,009 feet) to sea is only 10 miles, a rare and steep vertical descent. In 2007, a group of men tackle this Alaskan peak, intending to climb and ski it, an attempt at what may be the longest vertical descent in ski history. Brilliantly filmed and dramatically told, Mount St. Elias is an epic film about the obsession with a superlative mountain, where weather can change in an instant, and success is far from guaranteed.

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films each Tuesday and Friday, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Today we’re featuring Forgotten on the Roof of the World.

The Wakhan Corridor, a thin finger of land in northeast Afghanistan, is an incredibly tough place to live. North of Pakistan, bordering China and the contested Kashmir state of India, the people here are statistically high in poverty and hunger, low in health and education. Yet in Matthieu Paley’s stunning photographs that comprise this simple and memorable film, we see joy and humanity from the impoverished inhabitants. Beauty and hardship walk hand in hand in this collage of photographs and sounds from a place forgotten on the roof of the world.

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films each Tuesday and Thursday, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Today we’re featuring The 10 Conditions of Love.

Once the richest woman in China, Rebiya Kadeer is the exiled leader of the Uyghur people who live in her East Turkistan homeland, which is officially China’s Xinjiang Province. This oil-rich area has been referred to as “The Other Tibet” because its people are fighting for autonomy under a repressive Chinese regime (but without a gaggle of celebrities fighting for the cause). After spending six years in a Chinese prison for “terrorism,” Kadeer now lives in the U.S., where she stages a relentless human-rights campaign for her people. Three of her sons have been imprisoned by China, and this personal cost is too much for her daughter, Raela Tosh, who rues the pain her mother’s activism has caused the family. Kadeer is so controversial that Chinese nationalists tried to stop the world premiere of this film at the Melbourne Film Festival by destroying the festival’s computer system. This is the film’s U.S. premiere.

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we’re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films each Tuesday and Thursday, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Today we’re featuring Eastern Rises.

The Kamchatka peninsula in the Russian Far East may as well be at the end of the earth. Its enormous, wild landscape is threaded with rivers, swimming with massive mouse-eating trout and swarming with bugs and bears. In other words, this place is the Holy Grail for truly obsessed, halfway insane fly fishermen. Felt Soul’s Ben Knight and Travis Rummel last brought Mountainfilm audiences the story of Alaskan salmon at risk in Red Gold, and this film reunites the filmmakers with Frank Smethurst (the star of their short Running Down the Man) as he and other anglers head to Kamchatka during the summer of 2008. In this gorgeous film, fishing is poetry; Bigfoot lurks in the fog; and fishermen risk life and limb in decommissioned Cold War helicopters to explore rivers that have never been fished before.

Now that we’re in the countdown to this year’s festival, we”re sure you want to check out what films we’ll be featuring. Instead of just listing them, we’ll be posting trailers to selected films each Tuesday and Thursday, so keep an eye out for what’s to come! Today we’re featuring 180 South.

In 1968, Yvon Chouinard, Doug Tompkins and Lito Tejada-Flores were part of a group that drove from Ventura, California, to Patagonia to climb a new route on Mt. Fitzroy. The epic trip spawned a great mountaineering film (Fitzroy) and two major outdoor companies (Patagonia and The North Face).

Four decades later, director Chris Malloy followed mountaineer Jeff Johnson as he tried to retrace part of the route and recapture the same spirit on his own trip to South America. Of course you can’t just recreate an epic, but if you bring Timmy O’Neill along, sprinkle in the wisdom of Yvon and Doug and fortuitously pick up a beautiful surfer girl from Easter Island, you can create a lovely and thoughtful film. 180 South is about the true nature of adventure and how it’s changed and how it hasn’t.

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